Chowing Down on the Cheap

Chowing Down on the Cheap

Unhealthy fat man trying to eat one more pizza part

 

I save the least important subject of the site for last. You will always have a food budget, and eating right costs good money. In terms of its toll on health and wellness, cheap food is rarely worth the price. That said, you can eat well and save money as a student if you forego the more common options presented to you. Let’s dive into some of the food options and plans distinct to the college experience. Continue reading Chowing Down on the Cheap

Housing

Housing

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Housing

Ah, the college life. Fond, fond memories of those two a.m. prank runs, the late night bull sessions, the sort of crazy antics that come anytime you put six teenage guys in a small space with no direct supervision.

One way or another, college housing dynamics make or break a college experience. It probably goes without saying, but you will spend more time with your roommates than your profs and more time around your living space than in any classroom. Getting this right matters quite a bit to the college experience. You will have a lot more considerations to the situation than purely financial ones. Roommate selection, amenities, décor, proximities and so forth impact everything you do in college. Continue reading Housing

Audits

Audits

Science Teacher Standing At Whiteboard With Digital Tablet

Another Test Drive

Lastly, colleges often offer free or highly discounted classes via the academic audit*. In an audit arrangement students must get permission from the registrar to sit in on a class. The student can then attend the class and have access to all the related materials but will not take part in testing nor receive a formal grade. Continue reading Audits

Go Against the Flow

Go Against the Flow

Andere Wege gehen, Zweifeln, Abspaltung

In a previous post I encouraged summer school attendance as a key way to save both time and money in college. But any time the topic of summer school comes up so do objections such as, “But I need to work in the summer,” and, “But by the time summer comes I’m ready for a break.” However, both these concerns can be addressed if students can think about attendance in an even more contrarian fashion. Continue reading Go Against the Flow

Efficient Scheduling

Efficient Scheduling

Typical Schedule=Typical Results

Let’s take a look at how the typical student thinks about the scheduling of his academic career. Most expect to attend for approximately four years. These years consist of attendance during two semesters: fall and spring, with breaks in the winter and the summer months. During the semesters, a student will take a course load of typically 12 to 18 credit hours. Eight semesters later they have attained enough credit to graduate and they will now pursue careers or further education. Continue reading Efficient Scheduling

Experience Counts

Experience Counts

Young clever woman during her job conversation

Ad Hoc Test-Outs

At times certain professors or departments would be willing to sign off that certain students need not take their courses, contingent upon the results of an ad hoc test of some sort, whether it be to pass that class’s final exam or to have a more informal interview. Continue reading Experience Counts

Mix & Match

Mix & Match

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Even if you are averse to one or all of the suggestions above, or if you like any but not enough to otherwise derail your hopes for a more typical course of action, nothing says you have to think about college in all-or-nothing terms. While we tend to pursue higher education as though we had to pick a single entrée off the menu, students may want to shift the paradigm and consider earning their degree from a buffet of choices, taking a little bit here, a little bit there until they have a meal on their plate. Continue reading Mix & Match

The Traditional Job

The Traditional Job

This image is a sarcastic take on the value of a university/college degree

The Traditional Job

When a young person hears “get a real job” the underlying encouragement is to go out and get steady, regularly scheduled, “W-2” employment. College towns boom with such arrangements, particularly in the services and trades sectors of the job market. Finding such work is as easy as picking up the local newspaper, a job-specific classifieds newsletter, or searching out Craigslist and employment websites. Continue reading The Traditional Job